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Summary of the woman at the well

By Rev. John Trigilio, Jr. Kenneth Brighenti. The Samaritan woman at the well is no angel. Mixed up with a wrong crowd, this poor woman from Samaria has quite a reputation.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Jesus Teaches a Samaritan Woman

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: The Woman At The Well by Brenda Salter McNeil

Bad Girls of the Bible: The Woman at the Well

This Sunday, the Third Sunday of Lent, we will hear in the Gospel the story of the encounter and conversation of Jesus and the Samaritan woman at the well.

I invite you to think about the thirst of Jesus and the thirst of the woman in the Gospel, representing also our thirst, the thirst of our souls. On the surface, Jesus was naturally thirsty. Jesus asks the woman for a drink of water. It was quite unusual for a Jewish man to speak to a Samaritan and a woman. But our Lord does so with a deeper motive. He is thirsty for water, yes, but He is also thirsty for the salvation of the Samaritan woman.

We see this thirst of Jesus again when He is hanging on the cross. Some of His last words at the crucifixion were: I thirst. Yes, Jesus was physically thirsty, but these words have deeper meaning. He is thirsty for our salvation, thirsty for our faith and our love. Mother Teresa of Calcutta often meditated on these words of Jesus from the cross. She recognized their deeper meaning.

Mother Teresa founded the Missionaries of Charity. Mother Teresa wanted the sisters to meditate on these words, to realize that Jesus is thirsting for our love, our affection, our intimate attachment to Him, and our sharing of His passion. God is thirsting for us to come forward to satiate His thirst by giving Him our love and by spreading the love of His heart.

God is thirsty for souls. Jesus was thirsty for the soul of the Samaritan woman and brought her to faith. She, in the end, went forth to bring the Good News to her people. God thirsts for us. He thirsts for you and for me. What specifically is Jesus thirsting for in us? He longs for our love, our attention, our devotion, the total entrusting of our lives to Him. We can then respond to these words by being generous with Jesus with our time, giving Him attention throughout our day, and spending time with Him in prayer.

Jesus thirsts for us to surrender our lives to Him, to entrust ourselves to Him. She went every day to the well to draw water. Yes, this was a physical necessity.

But again there is something deeper here. The woman had many disappointments in her life. Like all of us, she was thirsty for meaning in her life. She was thirsty for love. Jesus pointed out to her that she had been married five times and now was living with a sixth man. Her life-thirst was not being satisfied. She was unhappy. Man is like a traveler who, crossing the deserts of life, thirsts for the living water: gushing and fresh, capable of quenching his deep desire for light, love, beauty, and peace.

We all feel this desire! And Jesus gives us this living water: He is the Holy Spirit, who proceeds from the Father and whom Jesus pours out into our hearts. Lent is a time for us to quench our thirst, to rediscover the meaning of our life in Christ. This is a special time to encounter Jesus like the Samaritan woman at the well, and to be transformed by our encounter with Jesus, like she was.

The Lord wants to give us living water. This is why He came to earth, that we might have life and have it abundantly. Sin is an obstacle to that full life in Christ, so we have this time of Lent for our deeper conversion to the Lord.

The Church invites us to drink from the living waters of the Holy Spirit. Then, like the Samaritan woman, we are no longer thirsty. In fact, we are transformed into missionary disciples, who go forth to bring the Good News to others, like the Samaritan woman did and like Mother Teresa did, going forth then to spread the love of Christ and satiate His thirst for the salvation of souls.

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Spiritual Rebirth: The Samaritan Woman at the Well

The story of the woman at the well is one of the most well known in the Bible; many Christians can easily tell a summary of it. On its surface, the story chronicles ethnic prejudice and a woman shunned by her community. But take look deeper, and you'll realize it reveals a great deal about Jesus' character. Above all, the story, which unfolds in John , suggests that Jesus is a loving and accepting God, and we should follow his example. The story begins as Jesus and his disciples travel from Jerusalem in the south to Galilee in the north.

Jesus Christ was the master teacher of all times. He taught in such a variety of ways. While he frequently spoke to the multitudes, he also spent considerable time in one-on-one situations.

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In Truth and Charity: The woman at the well

This Sunday, the Third Sunday of Lent, we will hear in the Gospel the story of the encounter and conversation of Jesus and the Samaritan woman at the well. I invite you to think about the thirst of Jesus and the thirst of the woman in the Gospel, representing also our thirst, the thirst of our souls. On the surface, Jesus was naturally thirsty. Jesus asks the woman for a drink of water. It was quite unusual for a Jewish man to speak to a Samaritan and a woman. But our Lord does so with a deeper motive. He is thirsty for water, yes, but He is also thirsty for the salvation of the Samaritan woman.

The Woman at the Well

Radio conversation released by the Chief of Naval Operations This is an apocryphyal story, but still useful for illustration. Americans: Please divert your course 15 degrees to the North to avoid a collision. I say again, divert YOUR course. Canadians: This is a lighthouse.

Throughout the gospels in the New Testament, there are many stories about encounters between Jesus and seemingly random people. I often study these scriptures and sometimes, commentaries in an attempt to extract meaning from these brief exchanges.

I have to confess, when I saw it listed in the church bulletin, I cringed a little. The Samaritan woman is one of my favorite characters in the Gospel of John. Traditional Christian interpretation, however, has turned her into a lazy, slutty sinner, an outcast in her community:.

Jesus and the Samaritan Woman

The Samaritan woman at the well is a figure from the Gospel of John , in John — The woman appears in John 4 :4—42, However below is John — But he had to go through Samaria.

Categories: Bad Girls of the Bible , Blog. Not this girl. A moment of relief during the heat of the day. He sat. The Son of God, the Savior of the world, was limited by his humanness, just as we are. Comforting, in a way.

Woman at the Well: A Story of a Loving God

Question: "What can we learn from the woman at the well? This was an extraordinary woman. She was a Samaritan , a race of people that the Jews utterly despised as having no claim on their God, and she was an outcast and looked down upon by her own people. However, this woman was ostracized and marked as immoral, an unmarried woman living openly with the sixth in a series of men. The story of the woman at the well teaches us that God loves us in spite of our bankrupt lives. God values us enough to actively seek us, to welcome us to intimacy, and to rejoice in our worship. To be wanted, to be cared for when no one, not even herself, could see anything of value in her—this is grace indeed.

Right from the start he began to woo our woman at the well. “If you only knew the free gift of God” (John EXB), he said. Did that make her nervous? She'd no.

He came to set people free from sin, Satan, and death and bring them God's kingdom of righteousness, peace, and joy. Jesus' public ministry was centered mainly in Galilee and in Jerusalem. He rarely left the physical borders of Israel. But on one occasion early on in his ministry he decided to cross through Samaria, a land which divided Galilee in the far north from Jerusalem and the region of Judaea in the south.

The Woman at the Well: How Transformation Happens

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10. The Woman at the Well (John 4:1-42)

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Comments: 3
  1. Tygogis

    It is certainly right

  2. Zusida

    I apologise, but, in my opinion, you are not right. I can prove it.

  3. Telmaran

    And that as a result..

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